Gnarbox update: The saga continues

This article follows on from the previous article about my experience with Gnarbox, which so far has been terrible and dismal. However, this is the first proper glimmer of hope. The Gnarbox Kickstarter project started in July 2015, and was due to be delivered in March 2016 (twelve months ago). They had made five promises of deliveries, and has failed to fulfill any. They have also blocked me on Instagram, their only channel of communication outside of Kickstarter. They blocked me because I was one of many who complained about the non-delivery in Instagram comments. It should be noted that the blocking occurred days before CES in January, and before Lok Cheung saw them. The community of Kickstarter backers have complained loudly at the consistent failure of Gnarbox to deliver. Then this morning, there was a break in the weather.

The Gnarbox page on Kickstarter.

The Gnarbox page on Kickstarter.

I received an email marked 7.38am this morning (my time) with the first update, first of any kind of communication from Gnarbox that I’m aware of in four weeks. In fact, the last communication from them was on the 16th of February, when in the comments section on Kickstarter they confirmed someone’s address had been received. Otherwise they’ve been ghost, and completely ignoring their Kickstarter backers. It appeared really bad, and it truly seemed like anything could have happened and we were in the dark.

This update is significant. But first I have to remind of you of their previous update on the 6th of Feb. They said that they had started production and quality control testing, and were aiming to get failure rate down, then the next week they’d go into full production and shipping, so we should expect our Gnarboxes by the end of February. Today’s update (16th March) said that they’d completed production, quality control testing, boxing, and shipping of the first 150 units. That is, it has taken them six weeks to achieve this with just the first 150 units, and that they had not completed the remaining 2000 or so units. These first 150 were sent to their friends, family, and “investors”. They didn’t define what an investor is, but backers are investors in Kickstarter language. They also said that assembly of the next 820 units has started and deliveries will begin from the 20th March. Following that, the rest are due to ship on the 3rd of April, which mine will probably be included in that last batch.

Again, what is interesting is what they did not say. They have not explained the four weeks of complete radio silence, they did not explain why they failed to do their production in that time, but could only achieve 150. However, these issues are small and insignificant to the fact that they are still committed to ensuring that from end-to-end they are still rigorously testing all aspects of what they are doing. That is to say, they are still testing their boxing, shipping, and tracking procedures on friends and family, and so this process should happen smoothly for the rest of us. I think it would have been easy for a very demoralised group that has failed multiple times to deliver on their promise just to give up and get it out without much more effort. In contrast, they are still committed to the learning experience and getting the production flow right. This point has to be acknowledged and respected.

Three things cannot be overlooked. Firstly, this is the sixth delivery promise they’ve made. The first being March 2016, 19th September, November, January 2017, February, and 20th March & 3rd April. Secondly, their planning needs improvement, but they certainly should have learnt a lot about this from this experience. Finally, communication, and therefore respect for their backers is in desperate need of improvement. A lot of excitement, enthusiasm, and publicity they garnered in July and August 2015 has been more than spent. Their product is already partially obsolete, especially as the built in wifi in new cameras means the Gnarbox no longer fills a gap in the market (Dan Cook on PetaPixel). Will I use mine? I don’t have a wifi enabled camera yet, but it could happen this year, and my new iPhone does a pretty damn good job for social media use.

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Tokyo is made of stairs

There are some things that travellers think they are prepared for, only to find that the guidebook said nothing about it. In this case, it’s that Tokyo is made of stairs. Well, mainly the subway public transport system; and not just Tokyo, but also Nagoya and Osaka too. As you will quickly realise on your first day here, it is tiring. Your feet may be sore, and your leg muscles worn, and you have quickly faded at the end of the day.


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Before you come to Japan, I strongly, strongly urge you to do a lot more walking as a part of your preparation. If you can use a stair machine, do. Sure, there are escalators and elevators, but stairs are the mainstay. Elevators are few and far between. Even though there is at least one elevator per station, these are impossible to find, or are very inconveniently located. So, if you’re carrying heavy suitcases, have a pram, or in a wheelchair, you will have troubles; so leave earlier than most people would. However, you will have a great time here. Bring high energy snacks to help you get about the place, but you will be a lot fitter for having lived or been here.


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Copyright and stealing photos

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. In restaurants, it’s free to look at the buffet, but it’s not free to take and eat. The same with photos, images, videos (and gifs), etc. Photos are free to look at, but not free to take. There have been website owners, bloggers, and other such people being served with take-down notices, having their website hosting accounts closed, and social media accounts closed too, all because of image theft. Photos cost money, and they are expensive to make. Don’t believe me? Well, you could obtain a license for my photos via the Free Photos info page, which will give you free access to galleries of my work, but for a trade.


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People want their time paid for. You don’t go into your job to work for free. You surely don’t do overtime for free. You expect financial compensation. That is true for models, makeup artists, and me. The lowest price I can get a model for is about USD$25 per hour; many command modestly to a lot more than this. Each shoot requires a lot of preparation, and time before the first camera button is pushed. What is the difference between a model and having a friend pose for you for free? A lot.

A friend working for free doesn’t know what to do with his or her hands. They typically only look at the camera, and expect magic to… magically happen. A professional model knows what to do with his or her hands, knows where to look, angles to put their shoulders. They know how to angle their heads. And that is just the posing. A professional model will always keep their skin moisturised, hairs and nails trimmed, and knows some basics about makeup art. There is a difference between the makeup ordinary people use, and the makeup a model would wear. Suitable makeup is not free. Also, in the heat of the moment, a professional remembers how to pose, and won’t go scatterbrained like beginning models (and photographers) would.


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The photo above was possible with a professional, still-life, gravure specialist model, and a makeup artist who can work quick, imaginatively, and can understand the context and make more of it. They know their stuff, and they know it well. Actually, I think I was the least talented one in the room.

After the shoot there’s the image processing, storage, and marketing. Software is not free. Hard disc drives for photos are not free. Marketing is not free. Just these three aspects costs thousands of dollars. There are cheap ways to do these things, but none are free. Online image storage for commercial sales costs hundreds of dollars a year. Every few years I must replace my external hard drives, and they cost a few hundred dollars each.

Some would say that an image that costs “hundreds of dollars” will sell many times, and so surely money will be made. Yes and no. Some images are more niche than others. Certainly the generic stock image will sell hundreds of times, and so the pricing is just a dollar or so. However, there have been confusing moments for consumers when two competing banks, by chance, used exactly the same $1 stock photos for their million dollar campaigns. The generic stock photos are clean and beautiful, but intentionally lack context so that they can be used for any purpose, thus increasing their sales potential.


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Rights managed photos, like mine, are usually specific to a context (typically Japan), and are as authentic as possible. The image above was one of the more expensive to make. In the photo you see three people, but you don’t see the other two out of view. There was the makeup artist keeping an eye on the models and holding the flash, and me. The rickshaw puller cost money, and it also cost me money in getting to Tokyo to begin with. This image is model released, of which there are three signed releases. Using photos you find on Flickr might be easy and… free, but they won’t have signed model releases, and so they cannot be used for advertising and other similar uses. CBS, among other news outlets, reported that a family sued an Australian mobile phone company for using a non-released creative commons photo of their daughter. The reason? It was extremely insulting, especially as it says in big bold letters “Dump your pen friend” and shows a gregarious Asian girl (see here).

Regarding the specificity and context issues, image above is in an obvious touristy place, as you can see someone taking a selfie in the background, and a crowd in front of one the most photogenic, iconic attractions in Tokyo, Senso-ji Temple in Asakusa. These are the things that separate my image above from free and generic stock images; the sales potential is low, and the cost to set up high. Furthermore, my images can be set to exclusive use, so to prevent copycats and rivals from using the same images for their campaigns.


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There is a myth that it’s ok to use an image without paying for it, as long as you provide credit and links back to the owners. This is not true. I simply cannot go into McDonalds, take a burger, and then tell everyone “I ate this burger that I got from McDonalds”. It will still be called theft. To use photos, especially when people are displayed in the photo, you need to have permission. Let’s say the photo above of the Vietnamese girl sitting on the balcony of a cafe in Saigon is used for a cafe advertising campaign; there’s little risk to her reputation and mine. However, if it was appropriated by an AIDS or mental health campaign, she risks huge ramifications in her community. There is a model whose career was destroyed by false claims of plastic surgery, as purported by an internet meme (see here).

In short, photos are free to look at, but like a Da Vinci, Caravaggio, or Dali painting, you cannot take them home without paying… or you’d risk an international manhunt. I do have cheap alternatives for for bloggers, and other personal uses; there are many licensing options, just take a look at my PhotoShelter portfolio. At the end of the day, we all enjoy our work, but we all still need to be rewarded.

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Naked Man Festival in video

I’ve covered the Kounomiya Naked Man Festival in the past; Kounomiya is the place and shrine near Nagoya, which is known in Japanese as Hadaka Matsuri, Hadaka means naked, and matsuri means festival. Below is the bigger spectacle in Okayama covered by the BBC just yesterday. Ceremonies for the Nagoya Kounomiya festival starts from this week, but the main event is on the 28th Feb 2018 (Kikuko Nagoya). If you want to participate in the this festival, you have less than 24 hours to can email Kikuko. Enjoy.

Correction: I just received an email alerting me to an error on a source website. The event is not 28th Feb 2017, but in 2018 (which is 13th January of the lunar year).

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Coming of Age Day in Japan


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Hong Kong model Sabrina visiting Meiji Shrine in Tokyo during the Coming of Age Day in Japan. The Coming of Age Day (成人の日 Seijin no Hi) is celebrated annually on the second Monday in January by only young adults who have recently turned twenty years of age. They return to their high school to attend ceremonies, and then go to shrines and temples to pray for their futures. Typically the guys wear a nice suit; the same one they would wear for job interviews, but the ladies dress up in kimonos.

Unfortunate for the young ladies who chose too come to Meiji Shrine, there were hordes of tourists, photographers, and Sabrina and I waiting to harangue them into photos and selfies. It was almost masochistic the attention these ladies received from almost everyone there. Anyway, with the ladies pictured above we were nice and respectful. In fact, they were happy to talk to a Hong Kong model, were pleased with the photos I took, and then asked me to take exactly the same ones with their own camera. Because they did us a favour, I was happy to oblige.

It was great working with Sabrina, I hope she had a great time in Tokyo. Update to the JapanesePhotos Instagram at: http://bit.ly/2kpZFbj. Also see other photos from this collection at the Sabrina gallery on my PhotoShelter portfolio.

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