5 Things: Bullet Trains in Japan #infographic

It’s not often I can do a “5 Things”, and it’s even less often I can do an infographic… so much so this is my first. The 1st October will be the 50th anniversary of the first run of it (Wikipedia). The image used here, bullet train interior, can be found at my PhotoShelter portfolio.

5 Things infographic. Inside a modern bullet train of the Central JR Company.

5 Things infographic. Inside a modern bullet train of the Central JR Company.

2 comments

  1. […] There’s lots of them. They’re everywhere. Even if you live here, you don’t really need to own a car at all. I know a family who rents a car two or three times a year, whilst most people don’t bother buying one; otherwise they’re an unnecessary expense. Cities are connected usually by city government-owned subway trains and buses, as well as some private train and bus companies. Then, satellite cities that feed into major metropolitan cities like Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Yokohama have mainly private train companies and Japan Rail (JR). Then cities are linked mainly by JR East, JR Central, JR West, or JR Hokkaido companies. This includes the infamous bullet train (see 5 Things about Bullet Trains). […]

  2. […] airport (aka Chubu airport), on a different Meitetsu train line. Nagoya is on the main Tokaido bullet train line between Tokyo and Osaka. It can also be reached from Osaka by the cheaper Kintetsu train […]

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